Artistic Explorations of Home – The New Indian Express

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People often associate North East India with artisans and artisans rather than visual artists. In an attempt to change this perception and bring Meghalaya’s women’s stories to the forefront, four female artists from the state have come together to present ‘Her Art-Handpicked Experiences’, an ongoing exhibition, open to the public on Saturday. and will run until November 26, at the city’s Meghalayan Age-The Store, which is the state’s flagship emporium in the capital.

Traditions and posterity

As the name “Her Art” suggests, the themes explored in this exhibition are intimately related to women and include birth, motherhood and marriage. In a collaboration between mediums, printmaker Careen Joplin Langstieh, who uses charcoal and organic stains as her primary medium, and Ridahunlang Gatphoh, known for her black clay pottery works or Khiew Ranei, presented the art installation entitled “Birth”. Careen says, “I was very interested in using Jain-it [a baby sling wrap used by the Khasi tribe] and Rida used birth as the scene for her pottery.

Explaining the collaboration, Ridahunlang – who incorporated clay with bamboo and cane – mentions, “Coming together, I think, we managed to incorporate the same theme well. When Careen started working with Jain-it, which is very symbolic because it is the first gift given by the mother-in-law to the daughter-in-law’s child as a blessing. My purpose comes from the traditional pottery practices I have worked with; this is how pottery is used for various traditional practices and rituals, including during the birth of a newborn when he [pottery] is used to heat water and oil. These two mediums, although different, have similar elements. Careen adds, “The pottery of Jain-It and Rida seems to be falling into place because it’s all about the child and understanding our system and our clan.”

For and by women

Another segment of this exhibition, “Mawbyrsiew”, is made by visual practitioner Balaiamon Kharngapkynta, who has two series: printmaking and lithography. Speaking of her work ‘Screaming Egg’, which Balaiamon said was a difficult piece to make because it used eight colors, which is a tedious task in lithography, she adds, “In this piece, the women are in the shape of an egg. You can see her scream but you can’t hear her.

On Saturday, in addition to attending a panel discussion, spectators also enjoyed a musical performance by singer Maya Lyngdoh Mawlong. Speaking about her performance, she tells us, “I grew up listening to Khasi lullabies. In my music, I’ve modernized those songs in a way that people will relate to now. “Every facet of this experience was centered around caring for women in the state. Giving us a sense of why this showcase focused on female artists and their works, Ridahunlang concluded, “In Meghalaya, women are usually the gatekeepers. However, we feel that there has not been much space for women to express themselves outside of the community. Through this exhibition, we try to share their stories with the rest of the world.

CHECK IT OUT

WHAT: “His hand-picked artistic experience”
WHEN: Until November 26
WHERE: Meghalayan Age-The Store, Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, Baba Kharak Singh Road

People often associate North East India with artisans and artisans rather than visual artists. In an attempt to change this perception and bring Meghalaya’s women’s stories to the forefront, four female artists from the state have come together to present ‘Her Art-Handpicked Experiences’, an ongoing exhibition, open to the public on Saturday. and will run until November 26, at the city’s Meghalayan Age-The Store, which is the state’s flagship emporium in the capital. Between tradition and posterity As the name “Her Art” suggests, the themes explored in this exhibition are intimately linked to women and include birth, motherhood and marriage. In a collaboration between mediums, printmaker Careen Joplin Langstieh, who uses charcoal and organic stains as her primary medium, and Ridahunlang Gatphoh, known for her black clay pottery works or Khiew Ranei, presented the art installation entitled “Birth”. Careen says, “I was very interested in using Jain-it [a baby sling wrap used by the Khasi tribe] and Rida used birth as the scene for her pottery. Explaining the collaboration, Ridahunlang – who incorporated clay with bamboo and cane – mentions, “Coming together, I think, we managed to incorporate the same theme well. When Careen started working with Jain-it, which is very symbolic because it is the first gift given by the mother-in-law to the daughter-in-law’s child as a blessing. My purpose comes from the traditional pottery practices I have worked with; this is how pottery is used for various traditional practices and rituals, including during the birth of a newborn when he [pottery] is used to heat water and oil. These two mediums, although different, have similar elements. Careen adds, “The pottery of Jain-It and Rida seems to be falling into place because it’s all about the child and understanding our system and our clan.” For and by women Another part of this exhibition, “Mawbyrsiew”, is made by visual practitioner Balaiamon Kharngapkynta, who has two series: printmaking and lithography. Speaking of her work “Screaming Egg”, which Balaiamon said was a difficult piece to make because it used eight colors, which is a tedious task in lithography, she adds: “In this piece, the women are in the shape of an egg. You can see her scream but you can’t hear her. On Saturday, in addition to attending a panel discussion, the audience also enjoyed a musical performance by singer Maya Lyngdoh Mawlong. Talking about her performance, she tells us, “I grew up listening to Khasi lullabies. In my music, I’ve modernized those songs in a way that people will relate to now.” Every facet of that experience was about keeping in mind the women of the state. Giving us an idea of ​​why this showcase focused on female artists and their works, Ridahunlang concluded, “In Meghalaya, women are usually the gatekeepers. However, we feel that there has not been much space for women to express themselves outside of the community. Through this exhibition, we try to share their stories with the rest of the world. DISCOVER WHAT: “His Art – Handpicked Experience” WHEN: Until November 26 WHERE: Meghalayan Age-The Store, Rajiv Gandhi Handicrafts Bhawan, Baba Kharak Singh Road

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